22 – 4 Life in Isolation

Another week of self-isolation here in what is likely one of the better places to be if one has to self isolate. It does have it’s limitations though, as it is some distance from anywhere and so the local walks tend to follow the same path. There are only so many kangaroos and sunsets that can be photographed.

That said, I am trying to make sure that I can capture something of interest every day which has two distinct benefits.

1. It gets me out of the house and doing some useful exercise.

And…

2. It gives me an excuse to practice using my new XT-3 camera.

With all of its bell and whistles, it is quite a different beast to the Canon range that I am familiar with. I was sorry that I had to leave Canon but their offering just didn’t stack up in the good, but light mirrorless range. The M50 was close but in low light, it showed too much noise to be able to eliminate enough, and it was just a tad too small for my big hands.

These few photos we’re all I managed for this evening. I hope you enjoy them

Til next time…

Social Distancing

The South Coast of NSW is idyllic in that it is not so far from the big centres of Sydney or Canberra yet seems a whole world away from the hustle and bustle of twenty-first-century living. More than that, there is a plethora of tiny bays and hideaways all along the coast between the small town centres that provide the necessities of everyday life. It is in one of these places that I have come to relax and recuperate.

As the sun sets on another South Coast day over Durras Lake, I find myself reflecting on the places life has taken me, it is quite possible that this may be the best of them

In this crazy world we are living in, with pandemic conditions calling everything we have known into question, I have found myself living in this perfect place for self isolation. Someone suggested that this is really an excuse for me to indulge in a reclusive lifestyle and there may well be some truth in what she said.

As I write this, I am lying back in a hammock, over looking the garden, and watching the parade of parrots, pigeons, and other birds that come to feed from the seed feeder hanging from the rafters.

One of the regulars in the garden is the Brown Cuckoo Dove. Doesn’t stay long but will visit the feeder for a quick snack

The news that keeps popping up on the banner headlines is almost exclusively about the Corvid-19 virus and what we may or may not expect over the next few weeks. As the reality of it all begins to sink in, I find myself thankful for this place and it’s quiet solitude.

One thing that is a positive is the time it gives to catch up on all those things that procrastination has allowed me to put off…. writing this instalment for example.. with just the birds for company, I can sit back in the hammock and write away to my heart’s content

I can walk on the beach, bush walk or simply stay at home mowing the lawns or doing some online courses that hopefully may pave a new pathway forward for me. Contrast this with the lives that so many others have to lead, particularly those in the health care field, putting themselves in harms way on a daily basis, and one gets a truly different perspective of what life is about.

If I should find myself in a country wide lock down I can think of few place that would be better to be than where I am right now. Keep safe people and take this thing seriously. It may not be you who feels the effects…. but it may be someone close

Photographing Kookaburras

Photographing Kookaburras is one of my favourite photography exercises. Always photogenic, these icons of the Australian bush are a pleasure to capture on film. Whether sitting, as this one is, on a branch or capturing prey on the ground, Kookaburras will generally guarantee a nice photo.

Taken on a Canon 450D, with a simple kit lens at 1/250 sec – f/5.6. The photo has had minimal development other than a 1 to 1 crop. After sorting through some old photos I found this one. It takes out this weeks photo.

Ever watchful, a kookaburra sits on a bare branch with its eyes peeled for some morsel of food that might go scurrying through the grass below. When photographing kookaburras, this pose always guarantees a good shot.
Ever watchful, a kookaburra sits on a bare branch with its eyes peeled for some morsel of food that might go scurrying through the grass below. When photographing kookaburras, this pose always guarantees a good shot.