Something from the stream side where I look at all this nature……

A Junvenile Noisy Miner fallen from its nest

Something from right outside my back door today.  I heard a bit of commotion outside as I made my breakfast and looked out to see two very frustrated Noisy Miner birds fussing over a chick that had obviously fallen from the nest.  After it had fluttered under my car I decided it might be safer up off the ground so I made a sort of platform where it could sit in the sun.

In A World Of So Many People, I Will Meet 100 Strangers

 


Jesse Taylor is today’s new Stranger. I meet him as I was taking out my garbage. He was headfirst into the back of his van sorting out some wiring. I noticed the guitar and music gear and stopped for a chat. 

Jesse appears to be living the dream… He has taken his love of mosaic and combined it with surfing and manages to keep it all together travelling and singing in his renovated tradies van. Currently he does his gigs, mainly around the Sunshine Coast but nest weekend will find him playing at Byron Bay in between hitting the waves.

Writing most of his own material, Jesse describes his style as Folk but will dabble in other genres such as Jazz and Reggie.


Check him out online… Jesse Taylor Coastline will find him in a search engine. Good start to the project and after listening to a few of his songs I also get a new artist to follow as I do the long miles down the road


This picture is #1 in my 100 strangers project. Find out more about the project and see pictures taken by other photographers at the www.flickr.com/groups

An Artists Impression

How many times do we hear the old cliche, ” a photograph never lies”.  In the digital world this is now, most surely, a myth. The image that the viewer usually sees is processed, often in the camera This means that it is a rendition of what a programmer at Canon or Panasonic believes is the best way to interpret light, contrast, and colours from the original raw data captured by the camera.

This is the original image taken from a car as we passed by her in the street. The woman in behind is kind of a distraction. This what the camera saw
With just a few strokes of my Apple Pen in an app called Photoshop Fix, the distraction has gone and there is a faint smile touching the subjects lips.

 

I guess it may be true when we look at the RAW image as it is first captured. RAW data is the light that is captured,  exactly as it falls on the camera sensor, when the shutter is pressed. There are, however, very few image viewers that will let you see these RAW images on the screen.  The ones that do are usually editing software that allow us to make a lie of the final version of the image.  We can make it darker, lighter, more contrasty, or change the way the light is represented from warm orange tones to cold blue ones. We can even substitute an unfavourable element within the scene for a nicer one that has been pirated from a completely different photo.

This being so, a big part of the photographer’s craft is in post editing.  That is what happens when the RAW image is transferred onto a computer.  To do this, the camera must be set to capture the RAW data.  Most DSLR camera’s can do this, along with an ever increasing number of compact models. In many ways the RAW image represents the old film negative, and post editing is equivilent to what the technician did in the dark room when he processed the images of the photographs we placed into our old albums and then stored them away in the cupboard.

Modern software can let us do almost anything with our digital images making a lie of the saying that a photo never lies.  This effect was achieved while processing the Raw image in Affinity for Ipad 

 

Even back in the film days, it was posible to adjust the way the light fell on a particular part of the image by a process called dodging and burning.  One made the image darker, while the other made it lighter.  This could be applied both globally or locally within the scene, depending on what was required.

 

The background of this photo is just a little bla with the uninteresting clouds and splash of blue.

 

The background of this photo was a bit bla and the people on the steps too dark and really just a bit inconsequential. Using Affinity Photo for iPad, I whitened the sky and brightened the overall scene make the people the stars of the show.

 

Modern software programs, such as Lightroom or Affinity Photo, still follow those same methods, albeit in a digital fashion. You will still find a dodge brush or a burn brush in the tool box available to the photographer.  In this, the complete art of the craft is more readily available to even the most amature of photographers.  It means that they can take a photgraph, process it on their computer and then either print it or publish it on one of many online forums such as Facebook or Instagram.  A great benefit is that the images can be stored on thumb drives and plugged into a TV or digital photo frame. This keeps the images alive, right there in the living room, instead of being hiiden away in dusty old albums that rarely see the light of day.

So what does this mean for the point and shoot photographer?  Well, nothing much.  The camera will usually produce a fine JPEG photogragh that can be printed or posted even with the limited adjustments that are availble to make it pop. However, if you want to do more, consider capturing your images in RAW format and have some fun with editing.  There are a number of programs that will allow you to do this, from the free versions to those that you buy or subscibe to.  There is a learning curve, but you will be more than happy with the better images you get as a result

What sort of images do you shoot?  RAW, or do you let the camera develop the photo for you?

What editing software do you find useful when editing?

The Naughty Corner

 

Ships leaving Brisbane Port in the early morning Sunrise Heading past Cotton Tree Beach On the Sunshine Coast

 

 

 

It has been more than a year since I took any serious time off work. To remedy this most serious of situations, I have taken some weeks off during which I intend to spend some time in Sydney, the Philippines and hopefully some other Asian countries as well.

The journey for me starts by heading to Sydney where I spent a week with my son, Sean, who lives in the Eastern Bays area.  After spending some time tossing up whether to drive to Sydney or fly, I finally decided that I would take advantage of the extra time a flight would give me and went on line to book a seat.

The cheapest fare I could find was with Webjet and so I commenced the process of securing a ticket.  Now here is where things began to become a little unstuck.  Each time I got to the point of making payment, the screen would freeze and I would have to start again from scratch. After the third attempt, I resorted to calling a consultant.  He was happy to help and finally put through the transaction around $30 more than the online price.  I asked why the difference and he explained that the fare I had online would have been sold out, and this was the next cheapest.

I pondered that for a while and thought I’d try again.  Sure enough, my cheap fare came up. I called my agent back and after some reluctance, he agreed that I should be refunded the difference. The catch…… They would credit my account for my next flight.  Really!!! Why would I use Webjet again? Again with reluctance, they agreed to refund the balance to my account.  So much for always getting the cheapest price when you use Webjet……

So much for my rant.

The day finally arrived when I would begin my next adventure. After a late night packing the last of my gear, I snatched a few hours sleep and woke to track down a ride to the airport.  This problem was solved with UBER. I downloaded the app and within ten minutes I was on my way.

Although it is an international airport, the Sunshine Coast Airport is small enough that it is not necessary to get there too much before departure but I planned on taking time for a coffee before the trip.  Not such a good idea as, as in all airports the cost of coffee was a little on the high side. Still, it was wet and strong and I used it to wash down an omelette.

I arrived at Sydney domestic after the short hour and thirty flight and caught the bus over to International to meet up with Sean who works there.  The rest of my day was spent wandering the Airport which is always a fascinating place to fill in time.

 

And so begins my latest travel adventure